SCOTUS refuses to hear Derek Chauvin appeal – Law Officer

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WASHINGTON, DC – If there were ever a case that seemed ripe for appeal, it was the state trial of Derek Chauvin who was convicted of killing George Floyd in 2020. From pre-trial publicity with the deck stacked against the former Minneapolis police officer to exculpatory evidence that was not allowed to be introduced as well as accusations that key prosecution witnesses committed perjury, surely the U.S. Supreme Court would hear the case after the Minnesota Supreme Court declined.

However, on Monday SCOTUS also declined to hear an appeal from Chauvin who is serving more than two decades in prison, FOX News reported.

“This criminal trial generated the most amount of pretrial publicity in history,” Chauvin’s attorney William Morhmann said at the time of the appeal. “More concerning are the riots which occurred after George Floyd’s death (and) led the jurors to all express concerns for their safety in the event they acquitted Mr. Chauvin — safety concerns which were fully evidenced by surrounding the courthouse in barbed wire and National Guard troops during the trial and deploying the National Guard throughout Minneapolis prior to jury deliberations.”

Furthermore, Alpha News presented a documentary, “The Fall of Minneapolis,” last week, which provided an overwhelming amount of information that would suggest an appeal was more than justified.

The film is based on Liz Collin’s bestseller, “They’re Lying: The Media, The Left, and The Death of George Floyd,” which exposes the gaping holes in the prevailing narrative surrounding George Floyd’s death, Derek Chauvin’s trial, and the fallout the city of Minneapolis has suffered ever since.

The documentary features more than a dozen interviews with the people directly involved, including exclusive interviews with former officers Derek Chauvin and Alexander Kueng who spoke to Liz Collin from prison. The families of Chauvin and Kueng also speak out publicly for the first time.

The film also features current and former Minneapolis police officers who tell their harrowing stories from the riots, recount the planned surrender of the Third Precinct, and explain why so many of them left the job.

A few retired officers also presented information that would seem to indicate former Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo committed perjury as it relates to the Maximum Restraint Technique (MRT). Despite pictures in training manuals appearing to mirror Chauvin’s actions with Floyd, and officer’s providing statements to verify the training existed, Arradondo testified that no such training occurred and Judge Peter Cahill ruled the training materials could not be introduced as evidence, one of the more stunning decisions during the controversial trial.

Chauvin previously had two federal appeals rejected as well an an appeal before the Minnesota Supreme Court. Now that SCOTUS has rejected his appeal, a lot of good people are questioning the application of “justice” in America.

Chauvin filed a third appeal in federal court last week, claiming new information from a pathologist in Kansas would have precluded him from ever accepting a plea at the federal level, Law Officer reported. 

Dr. William Schaetzel, of Topeka, Kansas, a pathologist, told Chauvin earlier this year that he believes Floyd died from complications of a rare tumor called a paraganglioma that can cause a fatal surge of adrenaline, according to court records.

In his motion, Chauvin claims that no jury would have convicted him if it had heard the pathologist’s evidence, despite the medical professional simply reviewing the autopsy reports and not actually a participant in the post-mortem examination.

As a result, Chauvin is asking the judge who presided over his trial to toss his civil rights conviction and order a new trial, or at least a hearing for him to present the new evidence.

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